What Does Your Customer Want?

In last week’s post, we discussed the importance of an effective communications process to your organization’s success.  The next logical question is –  “How effective are your customer communications?”

Good customer communications are the key to building a solid base, retaining customers for the long term, establishing strong relationships, and making their experience the best it can be.  Organizations that communicate well are generally rewarded with loyal customers, and steady and consistent growth over time.

Most successful organizations generally know and understand what their customers want.  However, in his recent article in Inc. magazine, Geoffrey James listed six attributes that every customer wants, regardless of the organization:

 

  • Preparation –  Doing Your Homework
  • Simplicity –  Making it Simple to do business with you
  • Creativity –  Identifying New Solutions
  • Loyalty – To Their Organization and Requirements
  • Accessibility – Making Them Feel Special
  • Accountability –  Not Passing the Buck

I’ll add two more to his list:

As you look at the list, note that many of these issues revolve around communications in one way or another.  Regardless of the form, all customer communications should meet the following criteria:

  • Clear and Simple
  • Build trust and confidence
  • Emphasize their importance to your organization
  • Demonstrate your understanding of their need
  • Timely

To do this well, however, requires discipline, focus and being proactive.  Too many organizations, however, either don’t understand the importance of this communication, or pay lip service to this process, and don’t make it a priority throughout the organization.  As a result, they are surprised when a customer leaves after feeling ignored, or taken for granted.

In my opinion, there is one final part of the process which is to establish and maintain a regular and consistent dialogue with your key customers.  This dialogue will build strong relationships, trust, loyalty, and credibility as a valued supplier, leading to an increased share of their business, where possible.  In addition, you will want to expand your relationship to as many levels of the customer’s organization as possible to reduce the risk of losing business if your key contact leaves.

By having this regular dialogue, you accomplish several objectives:

  • Build strong, long term relationships
  • Demonstrate your understanding of their business and requirements
  • Promote the value that your organization provides
  • Identify areas for improvement in your performance

Customers are the sole reason for the existence of most organizations.  If you communicate clearly, simply, and timely, throughout your customer’s organization, and make their experience that best it can be, you will be well on your way to having both long term customers, and consistent growth.

“Every contact we have with a customer influences whether or not they’ll come back. We have to be great every time or we’ll lose them.”  – Kevin Stirtz

“Spend a lot of time talking to customers face to face. You’d be amazed how many companies don’t listen to their customers.” – Ross Perot

“A customer is the most important visitor on our premises, he is not dependent on us. We are dependent on him. He is not an interruption in our work. He is the purpose of it. He is not an outsider in our business. He is part of it. We are not doing him a favor by serving him. He is doing us a favor by giving us an opportunity to do so.” – Mahatma Gandhi

 

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