Leadership Principles – Volume 2

In this week’s post, we discuss the next three of George Marshall‘s Nine Leadership Principles, including:

  • Speaking Your Mind: The Principle of Candor
  • Choosing and Rewarding the Right People: The Principle of Fairness
  • Supporting the Troops: The Principle of Caring

These three principles relate to how leaders communicate with their organization, establish a culture that rewards straight talk and candor, have the right people in place, and finally, take care of those people.

Let’s look at each of these principles and how they may apply to your organization.

Speaking Your Mind: The Principle of Candor
In many organizations, speaking up, straight talk, and candor are frowned upon, even at the highest levels.  While much lip service may be paid to these attributes, the organizations either penalize those individuals that speak up by labeling them as “troublemakers”, or, in the case of bad news, “shoot the messenger”.  These organizations also tend to obscure the information behind “corporate-speak” to avoid having to deal directly with contentious issues, “breathe their own exhaust”, and make decisions that may not be in the best interests of the organization because the culture does not allow debate or dissent.

Effective leaders that apply straight talk and candor, in all of their communications and relationships, create a culture of trust that promotes open discussion and debate, and in fact, rewards it.  As a result, not only are these leaders trusted and credible, their organizations openly share information, are aligned in the same direction, make good, well thought out, decisions, and execute on those decisions.

Choosing and Rewarding the Right People: The Principle of Fairness
There are actually two parts to this principle, which should be considered one of the primary tasks of a leader.  In his book “Good to Great“, Jim Collins calls this “Getting the Right People on the Bus”.

The first is identifying, and recruiting/promoting, the best person for each position and/or assignment based on the requirements of the organization, cultural fit (as applicable), and individual attributes. The element of fairness comes into play when the person is considered and selected on the basis on proven performance and attributes, and not necessarily because they were the “next in line”.

The second part of this principle is that once the right people are place, the leader and organization must actively support their efforts, and reward them with loyalty.

Effective leaders make these decisions, not on popularity, favoritism, or seniority, but on the basis of integrity, performance, judgement, and the ability to speak their mind for the good of the organization.  Having the right people in place improves delegation, organizational decision-making, information flow, and the overall performance of the organization.

Supporting the Troops: The Principle of Caring
Now that you have established an open culture, and have the right people in place, the final principle is to take care of them.

Morale is another key task of a leader, and one that cannot be delegated.  People want to know that their leader,and organization, has their best interests at heart, respects them as individuals and employees, values their efforts, and actively demonstrates that support and concern.  In many instances, it will be the little things that count, and work to demonstrate that support and value.

Effective leaders demand top performance, get out and talk with their people, tell them the truth, listen to their suggestions and concerns, and take action where possible.  Organizations that have good morale, and show respect for their employees will be more successful.

Utilization of these principles requires leaders that have a strong set of personal values, moral courage, and are secure enough to listen to and accept dissent for the overall good of the organization.  Those leaders can apply these principles to establish a high performance culture that speaks candidly, rewards performance, and values and supports each individual leading to the long-term success of the organization.

“Before you are a leader, success is all about growing yourself. When you become a leader, success is all about growing others.” — Jack Welch

“A real leader faces the music, even when he doesn’t like the tune.” – Anonymous

Leaders who make it a practice to draw out the thoughts and ideas of their subordinates, and who are receptive even to bad news, will be properly informed.  Communicate downward to subordinates with at least the same care and attention as you communicate upward to superiors.” — L. B. Belker

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3 thoughts on “Leadership Principles – Volume 2

  1. Pingback: Leadership Principles – Volume 3 | The Huttlin Navigator

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